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about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house pre ♪ >> this is book tv's live coverage of the national books s festival
program, civil-rights and everyone of his major -- was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress, to see him get that program up and running and has it, ramming it through. to watch lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he not only knows all the levers to pull but has the will. in lyndon johnson's case almost vicious drive to do it, to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i do the research look what he is doing. look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i tried to explain that in my books. to me, to see him doing that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory given true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books on lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand times already as the case in the centerpiece of this book, the assassination of presid
comments like that. he's proved her right. remember when rand paul came out against the civil rights act and then had to take it back when running for senate? remember how bad that was for him? did you hear what todd akin just said? stay with us. that's coming up. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! >>> i want to thank them for their help as well. and just in case anybody watching throughout the country, they are both available. no, no, no. only kidding, only kidding. only kidding, only kidding. ariana definitely is not available but ailer is. >> stop. >> this is ariana and this is ayla. i can see i'm going to get in trouble when i get home. >> that was scott brown the night he won the special election to fill the massachusetts senate seat two and a half years ago. right now in trying to get reelected, he faces a deficit among wome
paul came out against the civil rights act and then had to take it back when running for senate? remember how bad that was for him? did you hear what todd akin just said? stay with us. that's coming up. machine [ humming ] [ humming ] [ male announcer ] kraft macaroni & cheese. you know you love it. >>> i want to thank them for their help as well. and just in case anybody watching throughout the country, they are both available. no, no, no. only kidding, only kidding. only kidding, only kidding. ariana definitely is not available but ayla is. >> stop. >> this is ariana and this is ayla. i can see i'm going to get in trouble when i get home. >> that was scott brown the night he won the special election to fill the massachusetts senate seat two and a half years ago. right now in trying to get reelected, he faces a deficit among women voters of about 12 points. interestingly though, the most politically damaging thing about that awkward introduction to the national political universe might not have been what mr. brown said about his daughters while they tried to make him stop, but
for civil rights. "america's unwritten constitution" he's professor of law at the yale law school. president for the alliance of justice system. it is wonderful to have you here. this week, we have two blockbuster political events on the calendar. the first presidential debate and the return of the supreme court to washington. they will hear arguments since the first time on the affordable care act. a start and fresh reminder of the power of the court. the court returns with a docket packed with high profile cases and others likely to be heard. it's strangely almost entirely absent from the presidential campaign. it becomes alarming when you look at the age of the justices. 76, 76, 74, and the oldest is 79 years old. let's not forget she's the fifth vote to uphold a decision in roe v. wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. it will be my impression they will reverse row v. wade. >> it's very likely the next president of the united states will appoint several justices to the supreme court. that often is the most lasting legacy of
, they do have a lot to feel guilty for. it was liberal democrats that were the ones fighting civil rights for 100 years after the civil war in addition to fighting the civil war. and they just write these revisionist histories and then play act themselves being civil rights champions. um, i mean, the quote from bill clinton. on his first inaugural as governor, he was embracing orville -- [inaudible] who stood in the schoolhouse during little rock. democrat bill clinton invites democrat segregationist jay william full bright to the white house to give him the medal of freedom in which he cites fulbright, you know, he teaches us that the russians are people too. but fulbright didn't ever see that black americans were people, too, since he signed the southern manifesto, voted against the '64 civil rights act. cheryl: you really in the book go after politicians, and you say they have used the black community to their own benefit. >> oh, yes. cheryl: give me some specific examples. >> well, that's the funny thing. while being pompous and engaging in this moral training as if they are the champ
over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
in the civil rights movement is coming to d.c. host to the's browns. officialtory is the back onto theing field. pamela howze: it just seems like such an... infringement on our lives. how dare they step into my life that way. it's none of their business. he's trying to restricus, again. he's taking us backwards. george allen is the last thing we need in washington. anncr: the democratic senatorial campaign committee is... responsible for the content of this advertising. your share of obama's debt is over 50 thousand dollars, and it grows every day. obama's policies are making it harder on women. the poverov rate for women -- the highest in 17 years. more women are unemployed under president obama. more than five and a half million women can't find work. that's what obama's policies have done for women. welcome, daughter. [ romney ] i'm mitt romney and i approve this message. >> 55 years ago, a group of r theirs stood up fo an education. >> now the african-american is getting pieces of history from the youngest of those pioneers. greta kreuz has the story. >> september, 1957, black students inte
memoirs. he says it will trace his life from growing up poor and the south to his years as a civil rights politician. he will not shy away. >> that will be a good read. the man has stories to tell. >> i think it will be a best seller. >> abc 7 goes one on one with a woman who >> good morning washington. i am jacqui jeras. did you wake up early from the storms? we are still dealing with that at this hour. ride along the corridor getting ready to cross the potomac another strong thunderstorms. none of these are severe, but they are putting down heavy rain. if you can hold off heading out the door, i would do so. it will probably miss with traffic a little. manassas has just about 1.7 inches of rain. bristow just under 1 inch. the forecast for today, partly sunny and 67 degrees. 74 degrees by noon. most of the day dry again. we will see storms redevelop late in the day. how about it, angela? >> we are dealing with quite a few trouble spots out there. we've mentioned the word zone on i-95 in virginia toward frederiksberg between 17 and route 3 out of the way. they are getting that out of the
secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 203rd 1991. please welcome justice thomas and professor mark to the stage. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and tennant love for that extra nearly gracious, warm welcome. thank you for the national archives and the staff for making this event possible. thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center and thank you, justice thomas and off for being with us today as we mark the 225th birthday of our constitution. i guess i would like to start that conversation with the words the constitution starts with. we, the people. what that phrase means to you, how that freeze has changed over time thanks to the amendments and other developments. who is this we? when did folks like you when i become part of this? >> well, obviou
in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year very slowly and were reaffirmed and reshaped in the appropriations and budget legislation. families, people came to trust
than our century's worth of progress in civil rights. now the tide is turning. inch by inch, state by state, we've been reclaiming our rights and turning back the wave of voter suppression. we saw it when the justice department stepped in to block the laws in texas, south carolina and florida. we saw it when governors in six states all but one were democrats, vetoed voter i.d. laws. they were champions of democracy to do so. and we saw it when state and federal courts rejected laws in eight states, including today's major ruling in pennsylvania. this morning a judge blocked pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. from going into effect before the november election. after it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of voters face the real pocket that they would not be allowed to vote. but now this unjust law will not be in effect on election day in this critical swing state. it's a stunning rebuke to republicans and their shameless attempt to rig the system. just remember one of those state top gop lawmakers slipped up and said what these laws are all about. >> voter i.d., which is g
fairness in the workplace. does he believe in child labor laws? is he against the civil rights bill for public accommodations where you can't close your bathrooms to black people? what kind of laws is this guy for? apparently nothing. >> well, i think that you're probably onto something there, but the notion -- >> it sounds like his principle is don't mess with business on anything. >> i think that the notion that it would be -- that it is interfering with someone's freedom to say to them you can't discriminate against someone that is doing the same work just because they're a woman. you know, we've had an outpouring of support in the last 48 hours. claire mccaskill.com, people are coming there and they're really jazzed up about this notion that i was -- that i'm not ladylike. i am a fater, chris. i'm proud to be a fighter for missouri families and there's a lot at stake in this election and believe me, it's not over. missouri will be tough, this will be close. >> did you ever have a defense attorney say to you when you're putting a bad guy in prison, you're not being ladylike there
the civil rights movement, the gay and less lesbian movement. actually, i would like to say especially to my republican women friends these folks are not republicans. a lot of them used to be democrats. and started to lead the republican party when the civil rights act of 1963 passed and so on. so my -- really what's happened is that one party has campaigned against women you know. women have responded to that. >> jennifer: so you're stumping for the president. is president obama a feminist? >> yes i think he's a feminist. we had worked with him in illinois when he was in the state legislature. and he supported all of the issues of equality and he supported reproductive freedom. and the point is any way that feminist is a word that we chose because it could apply to men as well as women. and it -- it just means a person who is in favor of full social economic political equality of women and men and it is a great boon to men too. it actually has lengthened their lives, you know, to stop the extreme polarization of the gende
. >>> today also marks a milestone in the civil right movement. half a century ago james meredith confronted racism head on. >> that's right. he was the first african american student at ole miss and tonight the campus is marking the day with an anniversary celebration, but as randall pinkston reports, meredith himself remains a reluctant hero. >> reporter: students gathered in tribute on the campus where james meredith made history. >> i know i wouldn't be here if it wasn't for him. >> i'm proud to attend this school. >> reporter: 50 years ago meredith was the first african american student to attend university of mississippi. his trouble became a flash point in the civil rights movement. a defiant governor ross barnett repeatedly blocked him from enrolling and angry mobs rioted in the streets, but on october 1st, 1962, meredith attended his first classes at ole miss. today he remains a reluctant hero. >> for 50 years people have been thanking me, congratulating me. it wasn't james meredith. it was god all the time. >> reporter: after meredith mississippi gradually desegregated all of it
this morning. >>> the naacp is pressing the u.n. to send observers to monitor this year's elections. the civil rights group believes up to 6 million americans are being blocked from voting because of felony criminal records. >>> in spain, dozens of protesters have been injured in clashes with police. they're angry over cuts in public employee salaries, health and education as spain races to deal with massive debt. >>> in russia, this is incredible video. it shows a truck driver literally walking away from a crash with another big rig completely unharmed. he was hurled from his cab at the moment of impact but amazingly landed right side up with barely a scratch. >>> and finally, this is the deepest view space you have ever seen. the hubble telescope has sent back a picture more than 13 billion light years in the making. it's a collage of views, more than 5,000 galaxies captured over ten years. >>> and now here's an early look at how wall street's going to kick off the day. the dow closed at 13,457 after stumbling 101 points yesterday. the s&p dropped 15. the nasdaq tumbled 43. taking a look at
pennsylvania. a whole issue of voter suppression and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program "democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr
this year's elections. the civil rights group believes up to 6 million americans are being blocked from voting because of felony criminal records. >>> in spain, dozens of protesters have been injured in clashes witholice. they're angry over cuts in public employee salaries, health and education as spain races to deal with massive debt. >>> in russia, this is incredible video. it shows a truck driver literally walking away from a crwith another big rig he was hurled from his cab at the moment of impact but amazingly landed right up with barely a scratch. >>> and finally, this is the deepest view of space you have ever seen. the hubble telescopeas sent back picture me an 13 billliyearin t ng it's a collage of views, more than 5,000 galaxies captured over ten years. >>> now a first look at this lics.ng's dish of scrambled next month, stevie wonder is among the stars performing at benefit concert for president obama in los angeles. the hollywood reporter also says that on the bill with wonder will be jennifer hudson and kat perry. >>> michael bloomberg is on the nuerneheer in political offi
. >>> and the supreme court is back with some big decisions on civil rights that are coming up. a supreme choice is 36 days away. stay with us. [ mother bear ] you're not using too much are you, hon? [ female announcer ] charmin ultra soft is so soft you'll have to remind your family they can use less. it's made with extra cushions that are soft and more absorbent. plus you can use four times less. charmin ultra soft. why does my mouth feel dryer than i remember it to be? there are more people taking more medication, so we see people suffering from dry mouth more so. we may see more cavities, bad breath, oral irritation. a dry mouth sufferer doesn't have to suffer. i would recommend biotene. the enzymes in biotene products help supplement enzymes that are naturally in saliva. biotene helps moisten those areas that have become dry. those that are suffering can certainly benefit from biotene. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>>
fighting a civil rights and virginia. we have a state where they want to go backward. the federal government can do a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services. meaning the federal dollars -- to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services, to include housing. housing is a critical element in recovery. i guess my thought process goes -- somehow forced the state to discriminate against recovery, like they do in virginia, to spend some of the federal dollars on the offensive recovery support services. that is the nature of my thought process. by doing so, we can really reduce --, help recovery. to block out recovery people -- it is just insane to me. the state is not going to change. but the federal government if you just make a rule or regulation, you have got to spend a small amount of recovery and stop blowing it to agencies and virginia. i would be glad to elaborate after the press conference, of course. but that is the general thought and presidents. -- precedence. >> we have some programs that are specific arou
, georgia. he's urging faith leaders and even civil rights leaders in the african-american community to mobilize their churches to help kids, parents, and teachers find solutions to the problems in education. he says, kids must come first. >> we just have a crisis in our country. in our public education system is not doing well by our children, it's going to take an entire community to say enough is enough. >> johnson wants to level the playing field for all children who operate from a disadvantage, something he's too familiar with. >> and i grow up in a poor neighborhood and the only way to make it out of the community is basketball and got a scholarship to uc berkley. >> and he knows competing and winning, as a nba player with the phoenix suns enjoyed 12 years as one of the top players of the game. during his nba career, jonathan launched st. hope, a nonprofit community development organization to revitalize earn city communities in his hometown of sacramento. >> i didn't have any of my friends with me on college. they were on drugs, you know, in jail or dead. and i remember thinki
are involved in the civil rights movement or in the anti-vietnam war demonstrations or about black preachers who've been so involved in american politics. is it only conservative ministers that you object to? >> no. what i object to -- -- what i object to -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek to use the power of government to impose it on others. a minister who is in civil rights or in the conservative movement, because he believes his faith instructs him to do that, i admire. the fact that the faith speaks to us and that we are moral people, hopefully, i accept and rejoice in. it's when you try to use that to undermine the integrity of private political -- or private religious faith and the use of the state is where -- for the most personal decisions in american life -- that's where i draw the line. >> thank you. now, mr. president, rebuttal. >> yes, it's very difficult to rebut, because i find myself in so much agreement with mr. mondale. i, too, want that wall that is in the constitution of separation of chur
." this is a very old statute enacted by the first congress. it has sat dormant for 170 years. in some civil right type folks picked it up. -- been some civil right type folks picked it up and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign. the defendant is foreign. the tour took place in some foreign place. they say you have jurisdiction over this. courts have been going for this. they have been allowing some of these cases to go forward. this case raised the question of the of -- in this particular case, it took place in nigeria. the guy says the nigerian government committed these against me. they mistreated me. these foreign will company's work implicit -- foreign companies were implicit. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. the defendant say this is not apply to corporations. he cannot actually sue a corporation under the statute. that was their claim. they did something very unusual. they actually said we want to consider a broader question. we would like you to brief not just this question of does it apply to corporations, but also doesn't apply extraterritor
sapphire preferred. >>> the supreme court reconvenes monday with critical civil rights cases on the agenda. but it's november 6th, presidential election day, that could be the biggest day for the future of the court. the average age of the supreme court justices is 66. four justices are in their mid to late 70s. the ideologically divided bench could swing either way depending on who sits in the oval office when the next justice retires. joining me is patricia ann millate head of the firm's supreme court practice. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you've argued 31 cases before the supreme court. has that experience given you any insight into who might be the next justice to retire? >> well, i think it's very likely that the next president's going to have at least one, and maybe even two appointments on the court. obviously just statistically, if you look at age, justice ginsburg, ruth bader ginsburg is the most likely one if you just look at age. the longest serving ones, justices scalia and kennedy on the court. those type of factors obviously weigh in. >> i'm going to have myr d ja
years but in virginia specifically not all states are equal. we still fight civil rights in virginia and we have a state where they want to go backward it appears. now the federal government is doing a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services, meaning those federal dollars the come from virginia. to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services to include housing. housing is a critical missing element in recovery so i guess my thought process to samhsa and somehow force the state to discriminate against recovery like they do in virginia and spend some of those dollars on the authentic recovery and support service. that really is the nature of my thought process. by doing so we could really reduce the recidivism and increase recovery. the power to recover people is incredible and to block out the recovery principle from delivering those services, but like i say the state is not going to change but the federal government if you would just make a rule or regulation with those federal -- you have to spend a small amount o
thought stood out. great tape about the civil rights school integration stuff, call with president eisenhower talking about the cuban missile crisis. this was really interesting. kennedy on the optics of sort of being president and how the gop would seize on a photo op and try to take it out of context which doesn't seem like something you would be considering way back in the '60s. let's hear that tape. >> so apparently just as bad even back then. >> i think it was bad back then. there's this tendency to say it's worse than it's ever been. when you look at history all the way back to the founding you realize people were getting beat in the head with kaines on the senate floor and it's always been bad. that said i think kennedy was particularly astute when it came to optics and concerned with it. he was the first modern president in that regard, the one that came of age and owed his exe -- election to some extent to television. he was seeing it as a stage that had to be set and you see that reflected in those comments. >> now we don't need microphones. we just need juicy tell-all --
and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you can see the economy improving bit by bit by middle class people aren't doing that much better. people at the top are doing real well. corporations are reporting profits, but the people in the middle aren't doing that well. back in the old days tbhak the heyday of the middle class, everybody sharedded in that prosperity. today everybody doesn't share in that prosperity. that's why so many people feel so much pain. >> suarez: you take us again and again in the book to key moments where things could have gone
was blocked in unprecedented ways. >> caller: civil rights. let me make another civil rights point. >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: he is obviously the worst civil rights president we have and this is why -- >> stephanie: oh quite obviously. what? >> caller: because he executed a citizen of the united states without an advocate for the defense. without any judicial involvement, without any judge jury -- >> stephanie: who are you talking about? >> ground strike on the guy who -- >> yes he did. >> caller: let me add one other thing. >> sure. >> caller: we think we know about larky came from the administration so we have no independent information. >> that's not true. the guardian and other places confirmed that's exactly what he did. it was a question of whether or not this was reason enough to do it. now, would you agree that we have had since we've had a standing army, the right to shoot soldiers who go awol in the process? we've had that. >> i would agree with you. >> i'm just saying legally. a command
an economic problem all but it is deeper structure is that it is a civil rights problem. it is wrong. probably constitutionally, to greet a deficit structure which results in a tax necessity which reached out and grab the labor of future children without representation. that is a form of fiscal slavery to read you have reached out and grab their labor to spend it now. who are the but to the advantage? obviously everyone who are -- who benefits from government services and does not so to speak paid their fair share. it might be said there states the receive more than their fair share of government benefits. so there is a benefit by geography. there is one by sector of the economy. he might be -- you might be -- age and income are frequently referred to. they represent degette. that is why it is so difficult for us to close it -- they represent the gap. that is why it is difficult for us to close is carried if i were also a candidate, i want to talk about the solution to the civil problem be to invest in kids. it is difficult to solve this problem without an economy that is doing better. one of
people don't need a lot of living space. >> and activists believe civil rights could be compromised to make way for the housing. >> and did you lose your home in the great recession? still to come how you might qualify for part of a nationwide settlement for homeowner autos looking closely. do you recognize this reporter? coming up a well deserved salute to one of our abc 7 news colleagues. stay with us. >>> president ob krauma told the united nations he's disgusted by the antiislamic movie made by a california man but added bhaiming the united states is also wrong. the movie have become an issue in the race for the white house and abc 7 news is here with the latest on this controversy. >> the president spoke at the un general assembly today. and there is both talking foreign policy. >> at the united nations president obama used the world stage to decry recent u.s. attacks. >> they were attacks on america and should be no doubt we'll be relentless in tracking down killers and bringing them to justice. >> mitt romney hammer the president as what he characterized as the president's re
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 206 (some duplicates have been removed)